Physiotherapy

What is Physiotherapy?

The main goal of physiotherapy is to manage pain and restore relevant functions for the individual with exercise and adjunct interventions. Adjunct interventions include manual therapy such as massage and dry needling, as well as the use of tape, braces, orthotics, splints, and technical interventions such as shockwave therapy. These interventions are very firmly routed in science, and are based on high quality clinical studies.

How is Physiotherapy different to Chiropractic and Osteopathy?

Chiropractic and Osteopathy use joint manipulation and other soft tissue techniques to treat structural issues such as spine malalignment and muscle tone. There is certainly evidence that these techniques can be effective for pain, but limited evidence that they work by changing structure (read here for a detailed explanation). Progressive chiropractors and osteopaths recognize that there are other mechanisms (modulation of pain mainly) that explains most manual therapy, and that exercise is a critical part for most people. Generally physiotherapy has the greatest focus on exercise prescription of all allied health modalities.

So in essence, Physio, Chiro and Osteo professions are all moving in a similar direction, and the developing evidence base is driving that. Physiotherapists have had an active role in developing the research that guides our management of musculoskeletal injuries, including the use of exercise in injury management

Complete Sports Care is unique

At Complete Sports Care we have the resources, experience and research knowledge to bridge the gap between regular physiotherapy care and optimal management that will allow you to return to health and activity. We can guarantee our standard of care because you will only be seen by a injury management expert.

We treat injuries others cannot fix

We have a reputation for successfully managing injuries that are difficult, unresolving. We will provide a realistic assessment of your potential for recovery and map out a management plan and timeline.

Difficult injuries we specialise in include:

  • Achilles tendinopathy
  • Patellar tendinopathy
  • Tennis elbow
  • Rotator cuff injury
  • Hamstring origin tendinopathy
  • Tibialis posterior tendon injury
  • Plantar fasciitis
  • Iliotibial band syndrome
  • Shins splints (exercise induced leg pain)
  • Chronic strains and sprains
  • Shoulder pain
  • Groin pain (hyperlink to research)
  • Patellofemoral joint injury (hyperlink to research)
  • Back and neck pain
  • Hip impingement
  • Stress fractures